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Look Out of My Window

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The view from my desk lets me keep an eye on the yard.  When I begin work I often see small birds.  Later the doves take over.  All still seem to find good things to eat in the dried grass.

saltbush gold

 

 

The four-wing saltbush has taken on the gold of late autumn.  The chrysanthemum that somehow survives among the bushes is working hard to upstage it.

 

 

 

 

 

Leaves of the tall grass plant are turning purple.  At this stage it makes me think of shading done by an artist’s pencil.  big grass

 

 

The iron lily, a souvenir from Santa Fe, is strategically placed to cover a sprinkler head from an earlier life of this yard, when it was covered with grass.  When we moved in, nothing was left of that but the strings that once held the sod together.  It is by chance that it also makes a nice focal point from my window.

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On Time

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I’ve seen in various places the information that people kept away from the sunlight world and clocks will operate on a 25-hour cycle, instead of the 24 hours of the earth’s rotation to which we think we are accustomed.

Clock989I notice that the moon circles the earth on approximately a 25-hour cycle.   Is this a coincidence? That seems likely.  The moon is on its own path, against the earth’s turning.

Could it be that the earth once rotated on a 25-hour cycle?  At some time, very long ago, but after the creation of basic life forms which later evolved into our DNA, some cosmic event bumped up the earth’s rate of rotation to the present 24 hours.

I like this theory because it would make the following statement true:

“There aren’t enough hours in the day.”

I find myself thinking that thought far too often.  Are we being cheated out of one of the twenty-five hours in the original circadian rhythm for which we were designed?

Has anyone researched this matter?

Turn, turn, turn

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Another cross-quarter day, better known as Halloween.  I read somewhere that this is the third harvest, the others coming at Lammas (early August) and the equinox.  Maybe in Europe?  I don’t seem to have much to harvest this year.  In fact it is planting season for Swiss chard, the one vegetable I’ve succeeded in growing here.  But I do have flowers:

P1000985The chamisa and the butterfly bush are flaunting their yellow and red, and yes, fighting for space.  In the side yard the volunteer autumn sage is blooming again:

P1000987Fortunately, it doesn’t mind in the least that I never got around to deadheading the last set of blooms.  As the weather cools I hope to give the garden more attention.

In the summer I was fighting weeds with early morning forays with vinegar and salt.  It seems to work.  My front walk is quite well behaved.  Time to spend more energy on the other sides of the house.  Who was it who commented that something is always happening in a garden?

Some Poems

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I’ve had a couple of poems appear on line recently.

“Helpless” is about one of the difficulties of being a parent.  It’s a recent poem about something that happened many years ago.  You can see that it left an impression.  Oyster River Pages has published it:

https://www.oysterriverpages.com/helpless

“Midseason Report” is about fires in the western states.  It was written a couple of years ago, a season which seemed bad at the time, but wasn’t as bad as this year has been.  You will find the contents page for Route 7 Review at:

https://www.route7review.com/issue-5-2017

I’ve been noticing poems now and then which seem to fit our current situation, though they were written a few years ago.  I even have one of my own:

          Shaken

As a child in earthquake country
I knew the earth could shift
yet walked with confidence,
assured the fault did not lie
under the house.

When political tremors spilled
boxes into Boston harbor, an
Englishman’s table, set with tea
from Ceylon or India, fresh milk,
Caribbean sugar, did not tip.

New voices cried from far countries,
colonies.  In science, physics and
chemistry undermined foundations.
Causes widened like the Atlantic,
deepened into canyons.

Upheavals everywhere, I learn no
house is safe.  Leave silver locked
up, set teapots on tray tables ready
to be folded at the first
faint  rumble.

Two major earthquakes in Mexico recently. Political upheavals in Washington for months. Did I sense these were coming?  Of course not.

You can find the poem, and others that connect with it, in my book, Made and Remade (2014) available from me or through Word Tech Editions.  See Books page.

Late Summer Garden

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As I have mentioned before, I like volunteers in the garden.  A case of nature doing its thing.  But sometimes they get out of hand.  Last year I saw some grass leaves coming up, but wasn’t sure what grass it was.  This year, only its second, it looked like this:

P1000979It’s the child of the largest grass plant I have, shown here in the background, and much too big for the space.  I had to pay someone to take it out.  But I didn’t waste the plumes.

P1000980An elegant, filmy, look.  They lasted several days.  I also had some  desert globemallow getting out of bounds, so I brought some branches of that in too.

P1000982This bouquet was more short-lived, but pleasing while it lasted (I am partial to orange).  The globemallow is a short-lived perennial, but it seeds avidly.  I have quite a spread of it, third and fourth generation, I think.  One of the volunteers decided to lean toward my study window, giving me a bit of bloom to enjoy from my desk.

P1000983It is different every day as the individual flowers fade and new ones open.  I like it when a little of my garden can come inside for a bit – or at least “lean in.”

Small Visitor

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I discovered a turtle in my yard.  I first found him by a wall, later trying to climb over a hose on the other side of the back yard.

P1000975One day he or she was in the driveway, so I carried the creature back inside the gate and left him/her by a wall, near green growing things, after I took a few pictures.  The markings on the back are lovely, but gave me no clue about the species.

turtle closeup

I thought he might have left, but saw him again a few days later -he crossed the yard again, and apparently come out to dry out a bit after rain.

No further sightings in over a week.  I like to think my back yard is a hospitable place.  I hope you enjoyed your stay, little one!

Recommendation: From Egos to Eden

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Van Ham Book 001Lee Van Ham’s From Egos to Eden is a big book about a very big topic: keeping earth livable for humanity.  If that turns your mind to issues of cutting back, doing without and judgmentalism, put them aside.  This book will guide you into another approach entirely.  It is about growing into broader consciousness, growing from ego control to a larger sense of self, entering – or continuing – a journey toward what Van Ham calls One-earth Living.

This is not a how-to book.  We each have our own journey to undertake.  There is a bit of deception in the title.  Absorbing the concepts in this book will set you on a rich journey toward Eden, but it can’t take you all the way.  That is up to you.

The idea of an inward/outward journey is some decades old.  I remember trying to lead a church peacemaking group in which I could not get others to understand why the program we were using called for ten minutes of silence before getting to the business of the meeting.  It made sense to me.  The idea that we must work on our own issues while we address those of the external world underlies From Egos to Eden.  To address that Van Ham uses Jungian terminology, revises old mythologies, and offers a number of cognitive maps.

We humans have a choice of working with our earth to meet the needs of all or destroying it to supply our wants.  The topic is urgent because the current state of society is leaning strongly toward the latter.

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