Home

Shore Hike

Leave a comment

Maine is a huge state, but there are small hiking trails tucked away in unlikely places.  One is called Shore Acres, a walk through woods to the eastern shore of Deer Isle.  P1000568The trail is often swampy, but this year it was dry.P1000565

There’s plenty of moss, even in the middle of the trail.P1000567

Huge granite boulders are characteristic of the eastern side of the island. P1000569

This pink granite is not Deer Isle Granite, however.  That has more black and gray, less pink. It was near high tide, when the boulders look their best, I think.P1000570

The trail back from the shore to the parking area is called Stonewall trail.  Who is Stonewall, I wondered.  Here he is.P1000580

A short walk, only a mile and a half, but someone has to maintain it.P1000582

This sign made me think of blogger Russel Ray (http://russelrayphotos2.com/)  I suspect he could make a whole post about this Anonymous, to whom we owe so many traditional songs and melodies.  And this Anonymous works all year, on an island that depends on summer people.

Rainy Day Trip

1 Comment

When it’s not sunny and dry enough to be out on the beach or walking a trail, I am usually indoors with a book.  But at least once a year, when the weather is wet, I go to an antique store.  The Big Chicken Barn is a landmark on the Ellsworth Road from Orland. P1000560

More than an antique store, the Barn houses several dealers on the ground level, while the second floor is all books.  Walking end to end at the slow pace required to see what’s available is a long walk.  The different stalls have different specialties, but the predominant items are dish sets, glassware and cookware.P1000559

One visit a year is enough for me, but I’ve been visiting for several years now in search of two items: a small square Pyrex baking dish (mine broke years ago) and an enamel double boiler.  The latter are quite rare; apparently it’s not uncommon to burn out the bottom of a double boiler.P1000558

One year I found a new glass lid for my Dutch oven.  Another time I found a small Pyrex mixing bowl I needed.  This year all I came away with was a book – and it wasn’t even poetry.  Though the books are nicely arranged in categories: fiction, biography, poetry, art, religion, socialogy (so the sign spells it) the poetry section, as I have found in most used book stores, was tiny. Do poetry readers keep most of their books, or do they wear them out?

Plenty to Celebrate

2 Comments

Today is Juneteenth.  It’s a day to celebrate the end of slavery. I’d almost forgotten about it, which shows how removed I am from the news while on vacation.  If I had been paying attention I would have heard it is being given special attention in Charleston, South Carolina, as a response to the killing of members of an African American church that happened there a few days ago.

Juneteenth honors the day when a ship arriving in Galveston, Texas, brought the news that the Civil War was over and the Emancipation Proclamation signed by Lincoln two years earlier was now the law everywhere.  It’s not as widely celebrated as it should be.

Two days from now, June 21, is both World Humanist Day and the solstice.  Apparently the Humanists, after disagreeing about the day, settled on the solstice because (in the northern hemisphere) this is the day with the most light – an allusion to the enlightened mind that Humanists are trying to encourage in all of us.

The solstice, in contrast, is a day which has been honored since people figured out the cycle of the sun.

I think we should celebrate them all: the end of slavery as a legal institution in the U.S., the opportunity to think for ourselves, free of dogma, and the old, old cycle of the earth’s movement around the sun.

Wildflowers

2 Comments

These photos were all taken one sunny afternoon as I walked home from doing the tour of gallery openings in town. wildflowers1wildflowers2

All colors of lupines are out.  A few days ago I saw only blue ones.  I had not noticed before that the blue ones come first.wildflowers3Here’s a view of lupines on a bluff above a low tide. wildflowers4

No, that is not a dark sky, its shore and water. The picture is a little dark, however.  It turned out the battery was running low on my camera.  But I got one more nice photo before it quit.  wildflowers5With so much natural color in the world, why should anyone bother to make ugly art?

Remixing Kenneth Goldsmith

1 Comment

Kenneth Goldsmith has an essay in a recent issue of Poetry called “I Look to Theory Only When I Realize That Somebody Has Dedicated Their Entire Life to a Question I Have Only Fleetingly Considered.”    It is in the form of one and two line comments, with an occasional paragraph thrown in.  The topic is art, particularly poetry, and modern internet culture.  I should say the topics are, among other things, poetry and the internet.  The statements vary widely.  The essay is 14 ½ pages long.  Among the one liners are these:

”Sampling and citation are but boutique forms of appropriation.”

“Remixing is often mistaken for appropriation.”

So I’m calling this “remixing” because he makes it sound better.  But I’m really picking a few statements to comment on.

He writes, ”If you’re not making art with the intention of having it copied, you’re not really making art for the twenty-first century.”

So I think he would approve of this copying of his words.  Though this is not copying.  True copying would be reblogging, a favorite way of circulating material on the internet.

In a similar vein, many pages later, he writes: “When the art world can produce something as compelling as Twitter, we’ll start paying attention to it again.”  Who is this “we”?  He’s already paying attention to what he says isn’t working, is he not?

“All language presenting itself as new is recycled.  No word is virginal; no word is innocent.”  Well, duh!  If words didn’t have histories how could we (my “we”  is myself and you, the reader, here) use them to communicate.  Consider the failure of created languages.  When did you last read about Esperanto?

“Poetry as we know it―the penning of sonnets or free verse on a printed page― feels more akin to the practice of throwing pottery or weaving [sic] quilts, artisanal activities that continue in spite of their marginality and cultural irrelevance.”  I guess there’s no way to know how many bloggers are drinking artisanal coffee in hand-crafted mugs while they write their posts.  These are certainly not separate sets.  And as for piecing quilts, this activity seems continually to fold up and spread out again, like fabric over a bed.

He’s made a very gender-biased statement.  More women than men quilt.  Do more women than men care what mugs they drink from?  Has anyone figured out the ratio of men to women in the blogosphere?  Do more men or more women spend time putting their ideas out in cyberspace?

Enough.  I cut this essay from the magazine hoping to find poems out of playing with his 14 ½ pages of language about language and art.  Maybe not: too much theory.

Another Spring

1 Comment

Through a combination of an early arrival and a late spring, we arrived in Maine to find the forsythia in bloom. forsythiaI realized that I haven’t seen this in ten years, since we moved to the desert.  But, probably because it was not part of my childhood, I wasn’t really missing it.  It’s a wonderful announcement that winter is past.P1000545Now the forsythia has all gone green and the lilacs have burst out all over.P1000548I’ve been told that lilacs tell us when it is safe to plant tender crops.  Today I went out to buy annuals, flowers and herbs for the bits of garden around our cottage.  A lot of others had the same idea; the garden center was crowded.  So I guess I’m not too far behind schedule on this.

Happy spring to those who have waited a long time for it this year.

Hiatus

1 Comment

Hi-ā-tus.  Comes from the Latin hiare, to gape.  I wonder if that is connected to the fact that the “ah” sound is when the mouth opens widest.  The “a” turned long in hiatus, a word which first appeared in 1563, according to the OED.

I’ve had a number of gaps in my blogging in the past year, because other things got in the way.  Unscheduled interruptions.  I am now taking an intentional break.  I’m heading east and attending my college reunion.  I won’t have my laptop there.

My garden is sending me off with some healthy looking flowers.  The pansies have given me color all winter and haven’t quit yet.P1000508

These yellow daisy-like flowers are called Chocolate Flower.  Supposedly they smell like chocolate if you brush past them early in the morning.  I’ve never caught the scent.  Maybe it’s not dark chocolate.P1000506

I plan to be back in action about June 1, with pictures, I hope, from past and upcoming travels.  And the new thoughts that being in a new place sometimes brings.

Older Entries

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 281 other followers